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Enlil God of Air Discovery


Enlil was a significant deity in the Sumerian pantheon, known as the god of the air and the storm. He was one of the oldest deities in the Sumerian pantheon and was revered as the patron god of the city of Nippur.

Enlil was often depicted as a bearded man with wings, symbolizing his association with the air and the heavens. According to Sumerian mythology, Enlil was the son of the sky god An and the earth goddess Ki. He was born in the cosmic abyss known as the Abzu, which was believed to be the source of all life.

Enlil was believed to have control over the winds and the weather as the god of the air and the storm. He was often depicted holding a scepter or a staff and was revered as the king of the gods.

In addition to his role as the god of the air and the storm, Enlil was also revered as the god of justice and order. He was responsible for maintaining the balance of the cosmos and ensuring that the gods followed the rules of the divine council.

One of the most famous myths involving Enlil is the myth of the great flood. According to this myth, Enlil was angered by the noise and chaos caused by humanity and decided to wipe them out with a great flood. However, the god Ea warned the hero Utnapishtim of the coming disaster and told him to build a boat to save himself and his family.

Utnapishtim followed Ea's instructions and built a boat; when the flood came, he and his family were the only ones to survive. Enlil, realizing his mistake, repented and swore to never again destroy humanity in such a way.

Enlil was also closely associated with the art of divination and prophecy. He was believed to be able to predict the future and communicate the will of the gods to humanity. Enlil was seen as the patron god of seers and diviners in this role and was revered as the god of wisdom and knowledge.

Enlil was also known to be capricious and unpredictable despite his role as the king of the gods. In one myth, he tricks the water god Ea into giving him the secret of creating fire. In another myth, he helps the hero Gilgamesh on his journey to the underworld.

In Sumerian art, Enlil was often depicted as a bearded man with wings, holding a scepter or a staff. He was also sometimes depicted as a bull or a dragon, further emphasizing his association with the air and the storm.

Enlil remained an important deity in Mesopotamian mythology throughout the ancient Near East and was revered by the Akkadians, Babylonians, and Assyrians. Despite the rise of other religions in the region, Enlil remained a popular deity and continued to be venerated by many people throughout the ancient world.

Today, Enlil is remembered as an essential figure in Mesopotamian mythology and an enduring symbol of justice, order, and the power of the air and the storm.




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