Marveling at the “Great Ziggurat of Ur”

Updated: Apr 18



The Great Ziggurat of Ur is one of the most recognizable monuments in the history of Mesopotamia, as well as the world. To this day, the iconic step pyramid, with its 4,000+-year-old original foundations still intact, supporting relatively recent restorations, can be visited at Tell al-Mukayyar, near the modern-day Iraqi city of Nasiriyah, just a little over 200 miles south of Baghdad.

The Ziggurat of Ur was originally built in 2100 BC, by King Ur-Nammu, who dedicated it to the moon god Nanna, Ur’s patron deity. The structure’s measurements, consisting of mud brick, baked brick and bitumen to hold it together, are 210 ft. (64 m.) in length, 150 ft. (46 m.) in width, and its height is speculated to have been over 100 ft. (30 m.).

By the 6th century BC, the Ziggurat had crumbled, and King Nabonidus, the last king of the Neo-Babylonian Empire, took it upon himself to order the restoration of the great shrine.

Thank you, King Nabonidus! The Ziggurat of Ur has seen much since it was built thousands of years ago, including the recent wars in Iraq, which did damage it some, but the iconic structure still towers over the land where it stands today.

Now, let’s marvel at this iconic piece of history through the years, with pictures, from the early 19th century AD, when it was first described, to the present day.




The 1920’s


The Ziggurat in the 1920’s, as Sir Leonard Woolley saw it.



March 17-18, 1920. “The west corner of the ziggurat of Ur along the northwest side; Messrs. Bull and Shelton, and Prof. Breasted in the foreground, March 17-18 (Courtesy Oriental Institute)” (Archaeology Maggazine)



The Ziggurat of Ur in the late 1920s.



The 1960’s


The Ziggurat of Ur in 1967.



The Ziggurat of Ur, also in 1967.



The 1970’s


The Ziggurat of Ur in 1972.



The 1980’s


The Ziggurat of Ur in the 1980’s, partially rebuilt by Saddam Hussein.



The 2000’s


The Ziggurat of Ur in 2006



The Ziggurat of Ur in 2012.



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